Skiing the Pacific Ring of Fire and Beyond
        Amar Andalkar's Ski Mountaineering and Climbing Site
Ski Mountaineering Photos & Trip Reports Equipment & Info Cascade Volcanoes Ring of Fire Site Map

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OCEANIA MAP
  Mauna Kea
  Mauna Loa
  Haleakala
  Puncak Jaya (Mt Carstensz)
  Tongariro
  Ngauruhoe
  Ruapehu
  Taranaki (Mount Egmont)
  Aoraki (Mount Cook)


ANTARCTICA MAP





| The summit of Mauna Kea in the winter of 1971,
with snow down to about 11000 ft (3350 m)
(photo by Dale P. Cruikshank)   <click to enlarge>

Mauna Kea
    13796 ft (4205 m)     Highest point in Hawaii .
Location: Northeast part of island of Hawaii
Lat / Long: 19.8° N, 155.5° W
Volcanic Type: Shield volcano with cinder cones
Volcanic Status: Dormant, last eruption 4500 years ago
First Ascent: Native Hawaiian
First Ski Descent:
Skiable Vertical: over 3000 ft (900 m) possible;
Ski Patrol on winter weekends
Administration:   Mauna Kea Forest Reserve (State of Hawaii)



Mauna Kea, the "White Mountain", is the highest point in Hawaii and the highest volcano in all of Oceania. Since its base is actually on the floor of the Pacific Ocean over 20000 ft (6000 m) below sea level, Mauna Kea could certainly be considered the tallest mountain on Earth, and it is the second largest volcano on Earth after Mauna Loa. This great volcano has entered its old age, the post-shield stage of volcanism where the summit caldera has been completely buried by pyroclastics and lava flows, and capped by a multitude of cinder cones. During the Ice Age, a large summit ice cap covered about 25 square miles (60 sq km) and glaciers reached as low as 11000 ft (3400 m), leaving prominent glacial moraines which are ubiquitous in the alpine area. Post-glacial eruptions ending about 4500 years ago then produced the fresh-looking cinder cones which now form the summit. Over the past few decades, telescopes have been constructed atop several of these cinder cones, and a service road provides excellent all-weather access to the summit observatories. This road also provides access to the famed "Pineapple Powder", the snows that fall every winter and attract numerous skiers and boarders. Snowfall is typically heaviest in La Nina years, while El Nino brings warmer and drier conditions. Numerous webcams on the observatories provide real-time views of the snowpack at the summit (see the bottom of my Cascade Volcano Webcams page).


| Topographic map of Mauna Kea (1:250,000 scale)
from USGS Hawaii, Hawaii
<click to enlarge>
Some useful links:  

    Skiing and Snowboarding in Hawaii
    Ski Hawaii
    Mauna Kea Observatories
    Mauna Kea Weather Center
   
Topographic map of the summit of Mauna Kea (1:24,000 scale)
    from USGS Mauna Kea
    <click to enlarge>


      More photos and info about routes, access, etc. may be added in the future ...


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North America | South America | Asia | Oceania & Antarctica | Beyond the Ring | Volcanic Seven Summits | Volcano WebCams
Ski Mountaineering Photos & Trip Reports Equipment & Info Cascade Volcanoes Ring of Fire Site Map

Amar Andalkar   Seattle, WA, USA   <About the Author / Contact Me>
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